Creating a set of threaded tweets

Twitter icon

Sometimes one tweet is not enough to express the story you want to tell. You can create a connected collection of tweets known as a tweet thread. Now some of you might already be thinking if 280 characters is not enough then write a blog post or upload a deck of slides to SlideShare. These are useful ways to share information. Threaded tweets adds a further option that is quick and easy to do whilst staying within the Twitter app. Below are some examples of how this might be used.

Examples

  • A running commentary of a live event – this could include text plus images or video
  • Connect a list of instructions – this way the entire list can be viewed together
  • Curate tweets at a conference – a useful way to make notes at the different sessions you attend or if you are big Tweeter during one session
  • Build a connected quiz – here you would be posting a series of questions to prompt replies

How to do this:

  1. Click the Tweet button to draft a new Tweet.
  2. To add another Tweet(s), click the highlighted plus icon  (the icon will highlight once you have entered in text).
    Note: If you go over the character limit, the text that is over the limit will be highlighted for easier editing before you post.
  3. To delete any of your Tweets, click the delete button
  4. When you have finished adding all the Tweets you’d like included in your thread, click the Tweet all button to post.
  5. Once you have posted a thread, you can always add additional Tweets from the thread detail page. Simply click or tap Add another Tweet to post additional Tweet(s).

This GIF demonstrates what it looks like:

As you can see a thread will  appear on your timeline connected by a line to distinguish them as a bundle. When there are 4 or more Tweets in a thread, the Tweets will be truncated, and you’ll see an option to Show this thread. Click or tap this message to expand the full thread.

About Sue Beckingham

A National Teaching Fellow, Educational Developer and Principal Lecturer in Computing with a research interest in the use of social media in higher education.
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